Nature Feelz Symnposium

    In December 4-8, The Cairns Institute Fellow, Dr Larraine Larri and JCU Doctoral Candidate, Nita Alexander participated in the Sydney Environment Institute, “Nature Feelz Symposium” at the University of Sydney.

    The transdisciplinary symposium aimed to reflect on how heightened ecological distress informs our responses to the climate crisis. It drew contributions from scholars, activists, artists, therapists, citizens and community members, showcasing the diverse and creative approaches to experiencing, suppressing, making sense of, managing, preventing, intensifying, and resisting ecological distress. Also considered were the ecological emotions of beings other than humans. Sessions were designed to garner insights from people collaborating across disciplines and practices attempting to expand our conceptual scope towards addressing these issues.

    Larraine’s presentation, “ The craft of wisdom: Climate activist learning in the hands of Australia’s Knitting Nannas” explored how crafting became the core social movement learning process of the Australian Knitting Nannas and a strategy for generating climate activist hope.

    Nita, “(In)Action: Harm and hope in young people’s climate activism” drew on her latest doctoral work-inprogress paper. She presented an exploration of young people’s emotional connection to the ecological crisis that climate change presents. Young people continue to be largely excluded from politics. Dominant adult-centric narratives express concern for young people’s welfare in the face of climate despair. These narratives suggest that it is causing them harm to engage with the climate change crisis. 

    Of particular interest was the work being done by psychologist researchers Samantha Stanley, Teaghan Hogg, and Léan O’Brien on eco-anxiety, mental health, and pro-environmental behaviours. Their presentation defined the main features of climate anxiety and presented data on how eco-anxiety affects people.
    Key findings included:
    • Experiencing eco-anger predicted better mental health outcomes, as well as greater engagement in pro-climate activism and personal behaviours;
    • Eco-anxiety and eco-depression were less adaptive, relating to lower wellbeing; and,
    • Those feeling eco-depressed were more likely to report participating in collective climate action, while those feeling eco-anxious were less likely to join the cause.
    • Eco-anxiety is increased by engaging in social media and science communication. It is decreased most by nature connection, engaging in climate justice activism, and mindfulness or meditation practices.

    For more information, contact larraine.larri@my.jcu.edu.au

    Back to List


    More News


    The Unfinished Business: Fiji’s Colonial Legacy

    After almost 50 years of Independence, Fiji remains a fragile State politically because of the deep-seated racial division amongst our two major races.  There is a general recognition that it continues to cost the nation enormously, politically socially, and above all economically. There has be...

    Read More

    Putting farmers at the centre of industry innovation

    Putting farmers at the centre of industry innovation

    As the world’s population grows there is increasing pressure on the agriculture sector to produce safe, high quality food in production systems that are climate smart, transparent and ...

    Read More

    Halal supply chain competencies

    Halal supply chain competencies

    The Cairns Institute Researchers Dr Adam Voak and Dr Brian Fairman working with Dr Wahyuni in the Faculty of Businessand Law at the Universitas Muhammadiyah Sidoarjo, Indonesia have recently...

    Read More

    Ty'a Dynevor reflects on cadetship with the Institute

    Ty'a Dynevor reflects on cadetship with the Institute

    It has been over 12 months since Bachelor of Science student Tyá Dynevor joined The Cairns Institute (TCI) as a casual Research Assistant (RA) through a cadetship opportunity. He...

    Read More

    Symposium brings reef stewards together

    Symposium brings reef stewards together

    As the world races to slow global heating by reducing carbon emissions, coral reefs around the world are already struggling to cope with the rate of environmental change. Ignoring their decl...

    Read More

    IASNR returns to Australia

    IASNR returns to Australia

    The International Association for Society and Natural Resources were to convene in 2020 in Cairns for their annual meeting. However, when the pandemic was declared, the organisers pivoted&nb...

    Read More

    Shell money of power and the money of deceit

    Shell money of power and the money of deceit

    The colonial economy and its impact on social relations in the Aitape area of Papua New Guinea have been for a number of years investigated by Dr Maria Wronska-Friend, anthropologist an...

    Read More

    Deadly dancing

    Deadly dancing

    Under the The Tropical North Queensland Drought Resilience and Innovation Hub (TNQ Hub), the Sustainable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Enterprise Program (SATSIE) was extremely pr...

    Read More

    Top

    © 2024 The Cairns Institute | Site Map | Site by OracleStudio | Design by LeoSchoepflin