Introducing Ellie Bock

    Ellie Bock is undertaking a Master of Philosophy (Society and Culture), and in April presented her pre-completion seminar: Prescient Custodians: Biocultural Ecological Economics and Restorative Governance of the Wet Tropics.
    The Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (WTWHA) is considered the third most vulnerable of all protected areas on Earth to global warming impacts (Le Saout et al. 2013). Arguably this vulnerability continues to escalate as a result of pervasive neoliberal paradigms and increasing greenhouse gas emissions. A limited understanding of ecological economics and biocultural concepts characterizes the Wet Tropics region, particularly as these relate to established Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs) in this globally exceptional bioregion.
    WTWHA governance arrangements remained structurally little changed from their inception during the 1990s. Ellie’s research aims to investigate the intersects between ecological economics, biocultural concepts and a potential restorative approach to governance of the WTWHA and its buffer.

    Ellie has been successful in her application to bring her research into a PhD, which she will begin later this year under the supervision of Professors Allan Dale and Hurriyet Babacan. Her research aims to: 

    • Address significant knowledge and research gaps in relation to ecological economics in collaboratively managed world heritage protected areas.
    • Develop a unique bi-cultural framework relevant to regional populations.
    • Contribute to better understanding of the potential for IPAs to deliver ecological economic benefits.
    • Contribute to better understanding of ecological economics and biocultural concepts to inform a new governance model and policy frameworks.
    • Provide new research and an evidence base for policy change.

    Ellie currently plans to publish a co-authored journal article based on her findings to date in late 2022. NOTE: Rainforest Aboriginal Peoples group name positioning and indicated Indigenous Protected Areas (IPA) locations are approximate only.

    The Wet Tropics bioregion’s Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs) comprise: Eastern Kuku Yalanji IPA: Kuku Nyungkal bubu (country), Jalunji Warra bubu and balun (sea country). Mandingalbay Yidinji IPA: Mandingalbay Yidinji country, including sea country. Girringun Region IPA: Bandjin, Djiru, Girramay, Gulngay, Warrgamay and Nywaigi country, including sea country; and Gugu Badhun and Warrungnu country, in addition to Mungalla Station (Nywaigi country) and Yaballum (Girramay country).
    Source: Native Title Vision, with added datasets http://www.nntt.gov.au/assistance/Geospatial/Pages/NTV.aspx [Accessed: 23 April 2022].

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