Exploring the historical linguistics of endangered languages

    The decade 2022-2032 was declared by UNESCO International Decade of Indigenous Languages. In a world threatened by the loss of linguistic and cultural diversity, the documentation of endangered languages is one of the most urgent tasks. Language documentation also opens new diachronic perspectives on endangered and underdescribed languages. Historical linguistics helps reconstruct the history of many indigenous people and contributes to strengthening their identity and self-esteem.

    Exploring the advances in historical linguistics that are made possible by language documentation is the goal of the a special issue of Studia Linguistica edited by Luca Ciucci, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Linguistics at the Language and Culture Research Centre, has published. Luca has done fieldwork on several indigenous languages, such as Ayoreo (Bolivia and Paraguay), Chamacoco (Paraguay) and Chiquitano/Bésiro (Bolivia), and investigates their historical development.

    This special issue, From Fieldwork to Reconstruction: Historical Issues in Hotspots of Linguistic diversity, is the outcome of a workshop on historical linguistics Luca organized at the Cairns Institute in November 2018. Based on first-hand data collected by the authors, the volume brings together original papers which present new advances in the historical linguistics of a collection of languages from South America, and Mainland East and Southeast Asia.

    Contents of the special issue: From fieldwork to reconstruction: historical issues in hotspots of linguistic diversity by Luca Ciucci; Removing the owner: Non-specified possessor marking in Arawak languages by Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald; Northern and southern Munya dialects: Towards a historical perspective by Junwei Bai; Zamucoan person marking as a perturbed system by Pier Marco Bertinetto; How historical data complement fieldwork: New diachronic perspectives on Zamucoan verb inflection by Luca Ciucci; Determiners and the development of grammatical nominalization in Nivaĉle by Manuel A. Otero, Doris L. Payne & Alejandra Vidal; Prehistory of verbal markers in Hmong: what can we say? by Nathan M. White.
    Below is the link to the online edition
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14679582/2021/75/2

    The decade 2022-2032 was declared by UNESCO International Decade of Indigenous Languages. In a world threatened by the loss of linguistic and cultural diversity, the documentation of endangered languages is one of the most urgent tasks. Language documentation also opens new diachronic perspectives on endangered and underdescribed languages. Historical linguistics helps reconstruct the history of many indigenous people and contributes to strengthening their identity and self-esteem.

    Exploring the advances in historical linguistics that are made possible by language documentation is the goal of the a special issue of Studia Linguistica edited by Luca Ciucci, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Linguistics at the Language and Culture Research Centre, has published. Luca has done fieldwork on several indigenous languages, such as Ayoreo (Bolivia and Paraguay), Chamacoco (Paraguay) and Chiquitano/Bésiro (Bolivia), and investigates their historical development.

    This special issue, From Fieldwork to Reconstruction: Historical Issues in Hotspots of Linguistic diversity, is the outcome of a workshop on historical linguistics Luca organized at the Cairns Institute in November 2018. Based on first-hand data collected by the authors, the volume brings together original papers which present new advances in the historical linguistics of a collection of languages from South America, and Mainland East and Southeast Asia.

    Contents of the special issue: From fieldwork to reconstruction: historical issues in hotspots of linguistic diversity by Luca Ciucci; Removing the owner: Non-specified possessor marking in Arawak languages by Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald; Northern and southern Munya dialects: Towards a historical perspective by Junwei Bai; Zamucoan person marking as a perturbed system by Pier Marco Bertinetto; How historical data complement fieldwork: New diachronic perspectives on Zamucoan verb inflection by Luca Ciucci; Determiners and the development of grammatical nominalization in Nivaĉle by Manuel A. Otero, Doris L. Payne & Alejandra Vidal; Prehistory of verbal markers in Hmong: what can we say? by Nathan M. White.
    Below is the link to the online edition
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14679582/2021/75/2

    Back to List


    More News


    Indigenous Economic Development and Sustainable Livelihoods for Northern Australia

    Indigenous Economic Development and Sustainable Livelihoods for Northern Australia

    The Cairns Institute Research Fellow Dr Jim Turnour is celebrating after receiving his PhD investigating government policy and Indigenous economic development and sustainable livelihood...

    Read More

    Mosman Botanic Garden signs MOU with JCU

    Mosman Botanic Garden signs MOU with JCU

    The Mossman Botanic Garden (MBG) has signed a formal Memorandum of Understanding with James Cook University (JCU) and is progressing to implementing stage one of the garden project earl...

    Read More

    National Jobs and Skills Summit

    National Jobs and Skills Summit

    JCU’s Allan Dale, Professor of Tropical Development at The Cairns Institute (TCI), was one of 146 participants invited to the Federal Government’s Jobs and Skills Summit, held Se...

    Read More

    Engineers Without Borders Challenge Showcase

    Engineers Without Borders Challenge Showcase

    On December 10, the TNQ Drought Hub, Sustainable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Enterprise Program and The Cairns Institute (TCI) will host the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Showcase&nbs...

    Read More

    Building Social Enterprise Capacity in FNQ

    Building Social Enterprise Capacity in FNQ

    Social Enterprise is an emerging sector in Far North Queensland, a sector that presents a number of opportunities to build more jobs and to address some of the serious ecological, social and...

    Read More

    Draft protocols developed

    Draft protocols developed

    Discussions are proceeding with The Cairns Institute (TCI) about supporting a cultural knowledge and science database with Traditional Custodians of the Wet Tropics biocultural region. ...

    Read More

    Wet Tropics and Rainforest Aboriginal People (RAP)

    Wet Tropics and Rainforest Aboriginal People (RAP)

    The Cairns Institute (TCI) is partnering with Rainforest Aboriginal People (RAP) in progressing the management of the Wet Tropics biocultural region to help protect and enhance cultural and ...

    Read More

    Deadly Business 2032

    Deadly Business 2032

    Launched in Cairns on October 19 by Di Farmer MP, Queensland Minister for Employment and Small Business and Minister for Training and Skills Development, Deadly Business 2032 is a key a...

    Read More

    Top

    © 2022 The Cairns Institute | Site Map | Site by OracleStudio | Design by LeoSchoepflin