Agricultural futures: growing with technology

    Drought, climate variability, biosecurity, global competition and consumer preferences are some of the greatest challenges facing Australian farmers, their impacts threatening our position among the most efficient primary producers in the world. However, Australia’s primary producers have a long history of embracing innovation and adopting technology to improve productivity and adapt to harsh conditions.

    The Future of Agricultural Technologies report released today by the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACOLA) identifies and discusses the technologies that could address these challenges and bring about both incremental and transformational changes to increase the profitability, sustainability and productivity of our agriculture industry.

    The report was commissioned by Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel AO on behalf of the National Science and Technology Council, with support from the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment. It is the fifth report in ACOLA’s Horizon Scanning series, which draws on the expertise of Australia’s Learned Academies and the Royal Society of Te Apārangi.

    “Australia’s diverse agriculture, fisheries and forestry sector is a $69 billion industry, delivering significant benefits for our nation – particularly at a time where our economy is facing unprecedented challenges. However, reaching the Government’s goal of $100 billion by 2030 will likely require more than just incremental technological advancements,” Dr Finkel said.

    “Historically, Australian producers have been rapid adopters of innovation, and these emerging technologies will help our agriculture sector to transform and tackle current and future challenges.”

    Professor Stewart Lockie, one of the Chairs for the ACOLA Expert Working Group, said, “Innovation in our agriculture sector is critical for our economy, our food security and so much more. With a supportive policy environment, workforce and investment, we are confident that the future of agriculture in Australia will be one in which data analytics and artificial intelligence are as at-home on the farm as they are in any other high-tech industry”.

    The digitisation of farms through the ‘Internet of Things’ and data gathering and use will likely play a central role in future farm management strategies, allowing farms to track resources, monitor animal and plant health, support farm labour activities and enable precision agriculture.

    Other technologies could help us develop new products to meet climatic conditions and respond to consumer preferences, such as authenticating a product’s origins and quality assurance.

    ACOLA Chair, Professor Joy Damousi said that increasing technology uptake in our agriculture sector can also help Australia to maximise opportunities for regional employment, business development and Indigenous landholders. She also noted that there are clear roles for all stakeholders in supporting the sector to realise the potential of these new technologies, including to stimulate the agricultural technology and innovation ecosystem and build consumer confidence.

    The report examines the opportunities presented by nine technologies to improve the efficiency and profitability of agricultural production, develop novel agricultural industries and markets, and to contribute to a range of social and environmental values. The report explores technologies such as sensors, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, machine learning, large scale optimisation and data fusion, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and distributed ledger technology. Importantly, the report highlights the range of challenges and considerations for governments, industry and the wider sector to further develop and enable the adoption of these technologies.

    Download a copy of the report and summary paper via The future of agricultural technologies

    The Horizon Scanning Series is commissioned by Australia’s Chief Scientist, on behalf of the National Science and Technology Council. Previous reports have focused on artificial intelligence, precision medicine, synthetic biology and the role of energy storage in Australia. Reports can be accessed at Horizon Scanning Series

    Expert Working Group

    • Professor Stewart Lockie FASSA (Chair: from Sept 2019)
    • Dr Kate Fairley-Grenot FAICD FTSE (Chair: Dec 2018 – Sept 2019)
    • Professor Rachel Ankeny
    • Professor Linda Botterill FASSA
    • Professor Barbara Howlett FAA
    • Professor Alex McBratney FAA
    • Professor Elspeth Probyn FAHA FASSA
    • Professor Tania Sorrell AM FAHMS
    • Professor Salah Sukkarieh FTSE
    • Professor Ian Woodhead

    Media contact

    For more information or to arrange interviews, contact:

    Ryan Winn
    Chief Executive, ACOLA
    0484 814 040

    Back to List


    More News


    Introducing Nathanael Edwards

    Introducing Nathanael Edwards

    The Cairns Institute at James Cook University (JCU) is proud to announce its collaboration with Goondoi Arts First Nations artist Nathanael Edwards for a special inaugural art exhibition, Guwal Yabala...

    Read More

    Cairns Port Douglas Reef Hub now online

    Cairns Port Douglas Reef Hub now online

    The Cairns Port Douglas Reef Hub is a local network to connect, grow and champion the efforts of diverse organisations in the region to support the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. ...

    Read More

    Jabalbina MOU signing

    Jabalbina MOU signing

    A recent trip to the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) in Eastern Kuku Yalanji country saw The Cairns Institute's Director Professor Stewart Lockie participated in a meeting to workshop&...

    Read More

    "Reflections from the Kwibuka 30 Symposium: Commemorating the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda"

    Dr. Judith Rafferty, Adjunct Senior Research Fellow of the Cairns Institute, participated in a thought-provoking symposium at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, on April 11th and 12th. The ...

    Read More

    It takes a village to raise a family

    It takes a village to raise a family

    Held 16-17 May at the Cairns Convention Centre, the 2024 Early Years Conference (EYC2024) exceeded all expectations for the organising committee. The 400-delegates conference was sold o...

    Read More

    Thriving Kids in Disaster Report

    Thriving Kids in Disaster Report

    The Thriving Queensland Kids Partnership (TQKP) is a Queensland-based intermediary and relationships broker focused on systems change for the benefit of children and youth. Instigated and hosted ...

    Read More

    The Unfinished Business: Fiji’s Colonial Legacy

    The Unfinished Business: Fiji’s Colonial Legacy

    The Unfinished Business: Fiji’s Colonial Legacy After almost 50 years of independence, Fiji remains a fragile State politically because of the deep-seated racial division between the two major r...

    Read More

    Transformative Impact of Augmented Reality

    Transformative Impact of Augmented Reality

    As a dedicated researcher at the Blue Humanities Lab at James Cook University, Melusine Martin’s passion lies in exploring the intricate relationship between humanity and the world’s ocean...

    Read More

    Top

    © 2024 The Cairns Institute | Site Map | Site by OracleStudio | Design by LeoSchoepflin